eWingChun Official Blog

Posted By : sifugarry
Date: May 18, 2016
Sifu Garry’s Blog Development of Wing Chun Red Boats Opera 1800’s onwards Prior to the formation of the Red Boat Opera Troupe, wing chun was only a concept………… After the Shaolin Temples were destroyed by the Manchu’s, the surviving Monks fled south, mainly to Canton and Foshan, in southern China. The Red Boat Opera Troupe was a legendary rebel group attacking and fighting the Manchu’s, so they could rid the Qing and restore the Ming. According to wing chun martial traditions, Red Boat duo, Wong Wah Bo and Leung Yee-Ta were chosen by Yim Wing Chun and her husband, Leung Bok Chow to teach the pair concepts and principles of wing chun kung fu. Leung Yee Tai and Wong Wah Bo had as many as 11 peers in Wing Chun among their colleagues at the Red Boat Opera Company. For example, "Dai Fa Min" Kam, who played the role of the martial painted face, is the ancestor of the Way Yan lineage. The Yuen Kay-San and Pan Nam branches descend from both Wong Wah-Bo and "Dai Fa Min" Kam. Gao Lo Chung ("Tall" Chung) and "Hung Gun" Biu, also of the Red Boat Opera Company, both passed the art on to relatives, respectively, his son-in-law Yin Lee-Chung and the Wang family. Outside the Red Boat Opera Company, a monk who had taken the name "Dai Dong Fung" is named as its ancestor by the Pao Fa Lien lineage of Wing Chun. In this cohort of the Red Boat Opera Company, the role of the virtuous "female" was played by Leung Yee Tai and Yik Kam, better known as "Ching-Deng" Kam because of the role he played. Cho Shun, who played the "Little Martial" role, was a student of Yik Kam. By passing the art on to his son Cho Dak-Sang, Cho Shun established the Wing Chun lineage of the Cho family of Panyu village. Leung Jan is as far back as the lineages that descend from him Yip Man, Yiu Kai, Pan Nam, Tam Yeung. Fung Sing can reliably verify their genealogy. He was a practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine in the city of Foshan in the 19th century. Leung Jan is said to have learned from Wong Wah Bo and Leung Yee-Tai, respectively the male and "female" martial leads of the Red Boat Opera Troupe, each of whom is said to have been an expert on different aspects of Wing Chun. According to legends from the Yip Man lineage, Leung Yee-Tai was a poler, that is, he used a pole to steer the Red Boat away from rocks and shoals, and was therefore chosen by the legendary Shaolin master Jee Shim himself to learn the six-and-a-half point pole. Leung Jan's students included his sons Leung Chun and Leung Bik as well as "Wooden Man" Wah and Chan Wah-Shun nicknamed "Moneychanger Wah", from whom the Yip Man, Yiu Kai, and Pan Nam lineages descend. When Leung Jan was 70 years old, he moved back to his native village of Gulao, where he taught 3 people a synthesised version of his wing chun. In my next Blog, I will discuss Leung Jan’s influence on wing chun and his direct descendants around China. Sifu Garry’s wing chun kung fu in melbourne garry baniecki facebook wall wing chun kung fu greensborough martial arts linda baniecki’s wing chun manual sifu garry’s youtube channel sifu linda’s youtube channel sifu garry’s google+ sifu linda’s google+
Posted By : sifugarry
Date: May 18, 2016
Sifu Garry’s Blog “Roots of Wing Chun” China Trip 2006 - 2012 Over the years, there has been much controversy about my wing chun lineage and whether the people referred to, ever existed. Being involved with wing chun for over 27 years, I found this quite intimidating. To think that all the stories and history of the martial art system that I have dedicated my life to, were false. I decided to find out for myself. In 2006, I started my quest to discover the “roots of wing chun” and since then I have compiled ample information about my lineage, the history of wing chun and its grass roots. Firstly, where does wing chun originate from. Some say the Northern Shaolin Temple and others state categorically that wing chun comes from the Southern Shaolin Temple. Me? I believe wing chun emanated from both Temples, at different times. It is accepted today, wing chun found its way from the Temples to the southern province of Guangdong, in China. In the south of China, a group of Opera performers, named the Red Boat Opera Troupe, were responsible for developing a structure of wing chun still being practised today. After the destruction of the Northern Temple, the Temple Masters found their way south to avoid persecution from the Manchu Tyrants, whom were conquering China at that time. The principle persons were Ng Mui and Jee Shin. Jee shin eventually made his way south and joined the Red Boats. Ng Mui fled south and hid in mountains near Foshan. She eventually met a lady whom she taught the concepts of wing chun to. In turn, Yim Wing Chun and her Husband were instrumental in Teaching wing chun to several Red Boat members. After the destruction of the Southern Temple, a kung fu Master named Cheung Ng, aka, Tan Sao Ng, fled to the southern province of Guangdong, and settled in Foshan. Records state that Cheung Ng also introduced the principles of wing chun, to the Red Boats, to rebel against the Manchu. “Rid the Ching and return the Ming” Through records and data, history suggests that certain members of the Red Boats were influenced by descendants from the Northern Temple and other factions of the Troupe were influenced by Southern Shaolin Temple Monks. At this stage of wing chun’s development, remember, wing chun was only an idea about a new martial system. The Red Boats were responsible for creating a definitive structure. In my next post, I will discuss Wing Chun’s direction after the Red Boats and its development. photos on my facebook wall - www.facebook.com/sifugarry sifu garry's web site - www.shaolinjeeshinwingchun.com.au
Posted By : sifukenny
Date: May 18, 2016
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Posted By : sifugarry
Date: May 18, 2016
Sifu Garry's Blog Roots of Wing Chun China Tour - 2nd Leg Zhengzhou - Henan Yellow River and Shaolin Temple Just re hashing over some highlights from our 4 days stay in Beijing. Snack street delicacies, being scorpion, star fish, silk worms, centipedes and tarantulas. Wow, what a spectacle! The Rickshaw ride around the Hutong, (narrow streets of ancient Peking) took me back in time. Before the Hutong we visited the Bell/Drum Tower. The history surrounding this monumental structure was awesome. Atop the tower one had a straight line of sight to the Forbidden City, along the spine of the Earth Dragon. Walking to Tian an Men Square, Forbidden City and Mao Tse Tung’s Tomb is a must for all who come to Beijing. The size of the Square and Forbidden city is inconceivable. The grandeur and opulence of the Forbidden City is prohibitive. The Emperors certainly existed and ruled in a time of glory and achievement. The Shaolin Kung Fu live show we attended at the Red Theatre. The story line was magnificent, along with the kung fu performances. Last but not least was the journey to the Great Wall of China and the beautiful little village at the base of the mountain. What can I say, except, what a humbling experience. Now, for the second leg of our journey! We all boarded the Fast Train from Beijing at 8am and headed towards Zhengzhou, home of the Yellow River and Shaolin Temple. The journey was 750 kms long and took about 6 hours. Zhengzhou is a bustling City of 13 million. All the timing for our pre organized pick up from the train station, pre ordained booking of Coaches, Tour Guides and Hotel accommodation went to perfection. We arreived at our Hotel, Holiday Inn around 3.30pm. After a speedy check in at our Hotel we all jumped into our Coach and drove to the Yellow River, before it became too dark. The Yellow river is both historical and very spiritual. On the side of a Mountain overlooking the River are 2 monumental, large sculptures of the 2 most significant Emperors of China. The Yellow Emperor Xuanyan-shi wrote the classis book of medicine “the Nei Jing” and the very First Emperor, Fu Hsi, watched a turtle emerge from the Yellow River and created the I Ching and Baqua. So, being confronted with these majestic figures on the side of a mountain overlooking the Yellow river left me in total awe. The next day our group travelled by Coach for several hours to Mt Songshan, to the Shaolin Temple. Mount Shaoshi or Songshan Mountain is where the Temple is situated. We had to travel through Deng Feng to reach the Temple. Inside the Temple, we were privy to a Shaolin Monk demonstration which was second to none. Their martial prowess has to be seen to be believed. The Temple itself was magnificent. We were lucky to go into their living quarters and see where they eat. The entrance of the temple is ornate with ancient trees full of bullet holes which, now, the monks use for iron finger training. We spent several hours walking around the Temple grounds and on several occasions our group performed some wing chun forms. Sifu Linda and I also did some wing chun chi sao. As soon as one starts some form of demonstration, there is a crowd ready to take photos. As one walks past the Temple, there is the Pagoda forest. In the past there were 289 pagodas commemorating past Monks from the Temple. Some have been shamefully burnt down due to Wars. A cable car ride took us to the top of the Mountain which had some snow cover. At the top of the mountain there were some merchandising stalls and food for sale. As I peered cross the vast valley I could vaguely see a Temple built into the side of a sheer cliff face. It would take about 3 hours to walk there. Next time, though. What an amazing spectacle. After we came down from the mountain, it was time to walk back to the Bus pick up point. On the way several student bought some local products to take home. By the time we arrived back in Zhengzhou, it was night fall and time for another group banquet. Well, after 2 days and nights in Zhengzhou, I think everyone was agog with anticipation for our next leg of our adventure travelling across China. Photos on Facebook. www.facebook.com/sifugarry www.shaolinjeeshinwingchun.com.au
Posted By : sifugarry
Date: May 18, 2016
Sifu Garry’s Blog “Roots of wing chun” China Tour November 2012 Only one week to go before my 6th trip to China. The 2012 trip will be much different than our previous tours to China. Generally, the Jee Shin Wing Chun group start from Hong Kong, travel around southern China visiting and performing with wing chun schools in China. This trip will be a whole new adventure for Linda and I, as we have never been to the north of China before. Beijing is around 5000 years old. Starting from Beijing, we will be there for 4 nights; taking in sights and visiting the great wall, where many Emperors trod an ancient battles were fought. The MutianYu section of the Great Wall is about 80km from Beijing. It will take about 90 minutes travel by Coach. This section of the wall also has cable cars for your convenience. While in Beijing my jee shin group will be going to see a kung fu show, enjoy a Rickshaw ride through ancient parts of Peking and then visit the Forbidden City and Tian an Men Square. These ancient monuments are engrossed in the history of China. On out 5th day, we will be travelling 800kms by fast train to the ancient City of Zhengzhou. Zhengzhou is one of the ancient cities of China, which is about 10000 years old. While in Henan I will take the group to the Yellow River about 30 minute drive from Zhengzhou and then we will travel to the Shaolin Temple, the birth place of all martial arts. The Shaolin Temple is around 2000 years old. Guangzhou, formerly Canton is our next destination. During our stay in Canton I will be taking the group to Wong Ni Yim’s Anniversary Party for his Father. Generally, wing chun Sifus from all over southern Chian attend. This function will be akin to the “night of stars” in Hollywood. From Guangzhou we will be travelling to Foshan, the birth place of wing chun kung fu. When the Manchu’s invaded China in 1644, the south of China was the main area of refuge. All the arts, academia, medicine, and martial arts fled to the South. Southern China became the centre of intelligence. There were many revolts in the south against the Qing during the 1800 to 1900’s. An outer area of Foshan is Shunde. The legendary Bruce Lee was born in Shunde, and today, the Chinese dedicate an entire paradise in his honour, namely the Bruce Lee Paradise. The last leg of our trip we go to Hong Kong for 4 days. Hong Kong’s martial arts legacy is Yip Man. Apart from sightseeing and shopping I will take our group to visit Yip Man’s grave site in the New Territories and we are very lucky to be able to visit Yip Ching’s school, being the youngest son of Yip Man. By the time we all get to Hong Kong, we will have travelled over 3000 miles, by train, airplane and bus. The north will be cold and the weather will progressively become hotter as we move deeper into the South of China.
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